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Many Android apps and services are restarted by system events including notifications, synchronization or even as part of the operating system itself. While task killers can stop a program once started, they cannot prevent them from restarting.
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Android applications can be downloaded through several channels including the Android Market, Amazon appstore, or directly from the publisher. Android Market The Android Market app is preinstalled on every Android handset providing a fast and convenient way for users to purchase and download a variety of new apps for their Android handset. The market may also be accessed from a computer through the Market website (market.android.com). Applications purchased through the website are downloaded directly to the Android handset. Amazon appstore The Amazon appstore is a second option for purchasing and downloading applications. App purchases are billed through the user’s Amazon account. The appstore may be downloaded directly from the Amazon website (www.amazon.com). Non-Market Applications Some applications bypass the markets and are offered directly from the publisher. Before these apps can be installed, the Android handset must be configured to allow the installation of non-market applications. To allow installation of non-Market apps: 1.    From the home screen, press the Menu key. 2.    Tap Settings. 3.    Tap Applications. 4.    Ensure the Unknown sources option is checked.
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Occasionally apps are not able to be downloaded successfully.  The following are some basic steps that may help correct issues that arise. Market is stuck on “Starting Download” 1.    Confirm that the Android handset is connected to data (Wi-Fi, 3G or 4G). 2.    If downloading a paid application, check to confirm the payment information is correct. 3.    Ensure the handset is logged into Google Talk. Note: Tap Talk from the applications menu.  The application will login automatically. 4.    Restart the handset and try the download again. Download unsuccessful 1.    Restart the handset and try the download again. 2.    Confirm data connectivity (Wi-Fi, 3G or 4G). 3.    Wait 10-15 minutes and try to download the application again. Unknown error -18 1.    Ensure important files (pictures, music, media, documents) are backed up. 2.    From the homescreen press the Menu key. 3.    Tap Settings. 4.    Tap SD & phone storage. 5.    Tap Unmount SD card. 6.    Tap Format SD card. 7.    Read the warning message and tap Format SD card. 8.    Read the warning message and tap Erase everything. 9.    Try to download the application again.
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Users may wish to occasionally transfer images and video clips from their Android handset to a computer for permanent storage, or to create additional space for new images on the MicroSD storage card.  To following steps detail the transfer process: Transferring images and video: 1.    Connect the Android handset to a computer with a MicroUSB cable. 2.    Tap Mass Storage if prompted to select a USB Mode. Note: If the USB Mode prompt does not appear, drag the notification bar down and tap USB connected. Then tap Mount or Turn on USB storageand Ok. 3.    On the computer, click the Open folder option when the Removable Disk prompt displays. A.    If the Removable Disk prompt does not appear, open My Computer and look for a removable disk drive. B.    On Mac computers, the drive will install on the desktop, simply click the drive to open. 4.    Double click to open the DCIM folder. 5.    Double click to open the Camera folder. 6.    Select the images to be copied and drag them to the desired folder on the computer. 7.    Once the images are copied, they can be deleted from the Camera folder to create additional space for new images.
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As with many components within Android, the onscreen keyboard can be replaced with any number of options that are available in the Android Market. The following steps will help the user to activate and switch to a keyboard they’ve previously downloaded. Switching keyboards: 1.    From the home screen, press the Menu key and tap Settings. 2.    Scroll to and tap Language & keyboard. 3.    Some keyboards must be enabled before they can be selected.  Tap the desired keyboard and ensure the box is checked. 4.    Press the Home key. 5.    Tap to open an application with a text field (Text Messaging, Email, Calendar, etc). 6.    Within the application, tap and hold on a text entry field. 7.    Tap Input method. 8.    Tap to select the new keyboard. 9.    Tap a text field to ensure the new keyboard is active.
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When signed into a Google account with an Android handset, Google can automatically sync Contacts, Gmail, and Calendar events. Applications downloaded from the Android Market will have to be downloaded again. Purchased apps may be downloaded again for no additional cost, as long as the same Google account is used. A complete list of previously downloaded apps may be accessed by logging into the Market website from a computer (market.android.com). The website may also be used to quickly resend apps to the handset. Additionally, many apps have a built in backup or restore function. Phone contacts can be exported to the SD card and imported back to the handset after a master reset. There are many third party apps available to backup settings, apps, contacts, and more.  If using a third party app to back up, after a master reset, the third party app will need to be re-downloaded from the Market to restore any information. To ensure Sync is ON: 1.    From the home screen, tap or press the Menu key. 2.    Tap Settings. 3.    Tap Accounts & sync. 4.    Ensure Auto-sync is checked. 5.    Tap the Google account. 6.    Ensure the boxed is checked for each desired sync item. To export phone contacts to the SD card: 1.    From the home screen, tap Contacts or People. 2.    Tap or press the Menu key. 3.    Tap Import/Export. 4.    Tap Export to SD card. 5.    Tap OK. Note: If prompted to select an account to export, tap Phone.
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The following steps detail the process to remove bookmarks from the Android default web browser.  For other Internet browsers the steps should be similar, but may vary somewhat. Removing bookmarks: 1.    Tap the Internet or Browser icon on the home screen, or in the applications menu. 2.    Press the Menu key and tap Bookmarks. 3.    Tap and hold the bookmark to be removed. 4.    Swipe up on the list and tap Delete bookmark. 5.    Tap OK to confirm the removal.
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Yes, the voice input and text-to-speech services in Android do support languages other than US English. Use the following to configure the language settings. Note: Additional options are available through the Android Market: (Search TTS). Voice input settings: 1.    From the home screen, press the Menu key. 2.    Tap Settings. 3.    Scroll to and tap Voice input & output. 4.    Tap Voice recognizer settings. 5.    Tap Language. 6.    Scroll to and tap the desired language option. 7.    Adjust the remaining settings if desired. Voice output settings: 1.    From the home screen, press the Menu key. 2.    Tap Settings. 3.    Scroll to and tap Voice input & output. 4.    Tap Text-to-speech settings. 5.    Scroll to and tap Language. 6.    Scroll to and tap the desired language option. 7.    Adjust the remaining settings if desired.
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The instructions posted elsewhere on the web (and provided by Sprint Level 1 and Level 2 support) for performing a factory reset on a Samsung Transform which will not boot to an Android GUI are incorrect.  (The incorrect instructions are to remove and reinsert battery, then hold "volume down" while powering on the phone.)  The correct sequence is: Power down phone (remove and reinsert battery if phone is frozen in "on" state) Press and hold both the "volume down" and "voice dial" buttons Press and hold the power on button Once the word "SAMSUNG" appears on the screen, release all 3 buttons.  The progress bar will appear and continue across the screen.  When it finishes, you are then presented with a menu which includes options to boot the phone normally and perform a factory reset. Use the volume up/down buttons to choose the desired function, and the "voice dial" button to initiate the action. Hopefully, Sprint support will update their procedures!
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I love my EVO I love its play I love it more & more each day I love its size it’s the best I love its apps and all the rest I love my EVO this I know But Google could you please fix it so the forced errors don't flow EVO I'm true blue to only you as you hold my calendar, PDFs and itineraries to name a few I love the access to SoMe applications Now I don't worry about going on vacations I love the free web apps they're not drab or gray & Piles of new apps that grow each day I love my EVO & every file I'd love them more if the battery worked for awhile I love my EVO I'll say it again I even love those friendly & helpful Sprint CSR women & men The CSRs who've come today In clean black & yellow uniforms to make my day. Lisa Ann Landry
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Depending on what type of device you are using you may or may not be using the standard Android OS.  Even so, here are some tips videos from Google that you may find useful. Official Video User Tip:  Home Screen User Tip:  Shotcuts, Widgets and Folders User Tips:  Running Multiple Applications User Tips:  Long Press User Tips:  Browser User Tips:  Quick Search Box User Tips:  Contacts User Tips:  Android Market Original Source:  http://www.android.com/media/#android-20#android-22
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Original Source:  http://www.android.com/media/
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There's been a lot of questions about when we'll get the 2.1 upgrade (among other updates to our Android phones) -- Sprint Community member and Sprint employee halcyoncmdr wrote a great response to a forum post describing the process: I also want to point out that Sprint doesn't directly update the devices, the manufacturer does the coding based on the OS and customized code. So in the case of the Hero, HTC does all of the coding for the specific hardware (such as camera, cpu, gpu, etc. drivers) and then merges their Sense UI on top of it. After they develop a new build that fixes bugs in the call quality (for instance) it is sent to Sprint to test. If the build fails any test it is sent back to HTC to fix the issue. Only once the builds start to become more stable and likely to be released (known as a Release Candidate) will they begin to get a better idea on when it will be finalized and in a form that can be released. Once they get to stable builds and have a good idea on when the release may be the dates become more clear cut. So for instance originally the update was slated for 1H2010, but was recently changed to a smaller timeframe with an expectation it will be available early 2Q2010. As the builds become more stable and show-stopping bugs are fixed the dates will become more finely tuned. Not all ofthese dates will be publically reported (because of how the Internet responds to update delays, even with unofficial rumored dates as evidenced all over the place, including on these forums). This isn't specific to phones either, it is roughly the same setup for any electronic device or program. Everything goes through an Alpha - Beta - Release Candidate stage. Sometimes it is even more brokem down with Gama and Delta stages for example as well
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Hello Android users. What is the most valuable feature of the Android phones? Most would say the Android Market. I would agree with that. While some web articles, magazines, & podcast make app suggestions, looking through the Android Market does use up the one thing that is precious to our devices. Power. However, a lot of people want to do research on what apps to find. There is even an App section on the Sprint's Buzz About Wireless for suggestions & feedback. http://community.sprint.com/baw/community/buzzaboutwireless/apps/android_apps?view=overview Now how would you like the ability to browse the Android Market, but with the convienence of your desktop, laptop, or netbook? However, if you go to  Google's Android Market website, the browsing set is pretty limited. http://www.android.com/market/ With over 20,000 apps, I'm shocked that Google hasn't done more to allow desktop,  notebook, & netbook users to check these apps out. I have a couple of websites have created solutions to allow users to browse the Android Market. The first one is called Android Zoom. It breaks down apps by what type, popularity, & has detailed information on the apps. http://www.androidzoom.com/ The second one is called AndroLib. Just similar to Android Zoom. However this page is littered up with Google ads all over the place. http://www.androlib.com/ Both Zoom and Lib have screenshots, barcodes to allow for downloading, comments, popularity, etc. I personally think Android Zoom is a cleaner page with a Facebook fan page. http://www.facebook.com/pages/AndroidZoomcom/188997186095 Another site is called AppBrain. App Brain has comments, popularity, search, links to download, etc. No barcodes as far as I could tell. http://www.appbrain.com/ Another  really good one is called Android Market Directory. This one goes a bit further with by breaking down menu options to themes, development tools, devices, games, applications, & widgets. Very clean looking & detailed. http://android.touch-market.com/ An old site that did Android Market has returned called Cyrket. However, Cyrket has a lot of apps with non English characters which might throw off people. However it's very popular and allows the same breakdown of apps. Cyrket also does Palm & Windows Mobile apps as well. http://www.cyrket.com/ However, now users have many options to do some research on Android apps without draining your phone's battery life. The best part is you don't have to even own an Android device to look at these website or browse the apps if you are deciding on an Android device. I hope you guys enjoy these sites as much as I have. Peace.
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(Editors note - this document is from alostpacket on androidforums.com --- it's reprinted here with his permission.  Linky Hi all, This is a guide that hopes to give the basic info most people want to  know about the security of their phones, and when to download, and when  not to download applications from The Market.  It's my hope that this will help people make more informed decisions and  be safe about their application usage, privacy, and data.  I would like  to welcome anyone to post additional ideas or corrections that I will  try to incorporate into the thread as well, and hopefully if the mods  here see fit, they will make it a sticky. Background about Android The first thing when understanding the security of your phone is to know  a little bit about what makes it tick.  Android is a 'lite' version of  Linux with most applications that you download from the market written  in Java. The reason that this is important to know is that it means Android is  very unlikely to ever get a virus in the  traditional sense of 'virus.'  Part of  the reason why is because Linux is a fairly secure operating system that  protects various parts of itself from other parts.  For the more  technically inclined this is similar to how Windows has admin accounts  and limited user accounts.  Because of this protection, applications  downloaded from the market do not have access to anything by default.   You must grant them permission for each activity they want to perform  when they are installed.  This is a very important point which we will  address a bit later. Nevertheless, while Android is very unlikely to get a 'virus', that does not mean you are completely  safe from 'malware', 'spyware', or other harmful types of programs. Types of Dangerous Programs Probably the biggest threat from any application in the market is one  where it trys to trick the user into entering in their data or giving it  permission it doesn't require to do it's job.  There are various types  of these and we'll briefly define each kind just to have a common  understanding of the terms. Malware Malware generally is more of an all-encompassing term used to describe  any harmful program.  This includes spyware, viruses, and phishing scams  (sometimes). Spyware Spyware is usually used to describe software or applications that read  your information and data without you actually knowing it and reporting  it back to some unknown third party for nefarious purposes.  Often times  this includes keystroke loggers to steal passwords or credit card  information. Phishing Phishing and spyware are often related.  The work on a similar principle  of tricking the user and sending user information to a 3rd party to  steal it.  The difference with phishing however, is that the application  (or website) will pretend to be from a trusted source to try and  'trick' you into entering in your details.  Usually this would be a app  or website pretending to be affiliated with you bank or Paypal or your  email provider (Gmail, Hotmail, Yahoo).  However it can, and does  include any service where someone might want to steal your identity or  password.   As far as I know, this is the one and only type of malware  that has yet come out for Android.  You can read about it here: Phishing Android App Steals Banking Info | Android  Phone Fans Virus The definition of virus used to be more  of the all-encompassing definition that has been replace by the term  malware.  Today, virus is more typically  used to describe a specific type of software that takes control of your  operating system and either damages it, or uses it for its own purposes.   An example might be when a virus send  emails to everyone in your email address book.  Again this is the type  of program least likely to be a problem for Android. Adware Adware is typically a bit of a grey area.  Sometimes this is also called  nuisance-ware.   This type of application will often show the users an  excessive amount of advertising in return for providing a service to the  user of dubious quality.  However, this type of program can often be  confused with legitimate ad-supported software, which shows a mild to  moderate amount of advertising while providing a useful service that the  user wants.  Because it can be hard to tell the difference, there  exists a grey area from most anti-virus companies as to how to handle  adware. How to Protect Yourself There are no full-proof ways to avoid all bad situations in the world,  but any sane person with a reasonable head on their shoulders knows that  a few good habits can keep you safe for a long, long time in whatever  you do.  Here are a few tips I have learned from many years as a  professional software developer and from reading these forums that have  many people smarter and more knowledgeable than I about Android Read the comments in the Market This should go without saying. Before you download any applications, be  sure to read the comments.  Don't just read the first three either,  click through and see what people are saying.  This can also help you  understand how well an app work on your particular phone or your  particular version of Android.  Comments should also be read EVERY time  you update an app. Check the Rating Any app that fails to maintain even 3 stars is likely not worth your  time.  If you are brave enough to be one of the first few to download an  app, this may not apply to you, but almost all good apps have between 4  and 5 stars.  This to me has been a great general rule for finding both  safe, AND quality apps. Check the permissions There are many things an app can do to, and for your phone.  But any of  these things that an app can do are told to you when you download and  install it.  Your phone will show you a list of the things that  application will need to function.  Read them.  Try your best to  understand them in terms of what the application is supposed to do for  you.  For example, if you download a game of checkers, and the Market  warns you that it wants to be able to read your contacts, you should  think twice and probably not download it.  There is no sane reason a  game of checkers needs to know your friend's phone numbers. To see the permission given to an application after installation, go to   the market, press menu, downloads, then select the app, press menu   again, then press security. Check the developer's website Make sure the developer has a website and not just some Wordpress blog.   This is often again a good indication of quality as well as safety.  If  the developer cares about their app they will likely have a relatively  nice looking website or, if they are open source, a site on Google Code.   Note: sites on Google code are NOT verified or approved by Google.   However, open source is usually (but not always) more likely to  indicate a safe application. Updating applications is the same as installing them fresh Each time you update an application on your phone, you should use the  same diligence as if you were installing it for the first time.  Reread  the permissions to see that it is only asking for what it needs and no  more.  Reread the comments to see if anything has changed in the  opinions of the users and to see if it still works for your phone. If you are still unsure, ask around -- the community is your  anti-virus If you see an app you want, but it seems to be asking for more  permissions that it should, or it's comments and ratings are mediocre,  go ahead and ask about the app in these (and other) forums.  You will  often find dozens if not more people who know the answers and another  whole bunch wishing to know the answers to the same questions you have.   Posting your own comments After you have downloaded an app you can post you own comments.  The  comment will be visible to all other android users but it will only show  your first name.  To do this go into the Market and press menu >   downloads.  You should see five empty stars at the top which you can   tap to rate the app.  Once you have rated the app you should see an   option to add a comment under the stars.         What does Google do to protect us? Unfortunately at the moment, not a lot.  They do police the market to a  small extent and investigate any reports of malware.  They removed the  one instance mentioned above of the phishing application to protect the  users of the Market.  However, the Market is not like the Apple App  Store, there is no screening of applications before they are posted to  the market.  There are no draconian procedures or lengthy approval  processes that developers have to go through to post applications.  All  that a developer needs to do is to 'digitally self sign' his or her  application before posting it.  This helps Google track any developers  with ill intent such as the one who made the phishing app (we likely  wont ever see his apps again), but it's just a way to manage malware after it is discovered. What about Wi-Fi? One of the things to remember when trying to keep yourself safe is to be  very careful with public Wi-Fi.  Whenever you connect to the internet  through a public Wi-Fi you should never use any website that requires a  password to sign into.  The danger here is because you have no idea who  is connecting you to the website your are trying to connect to.  A good  analogy would be like trying to mail a letter to your friend by giving  it to a stranger in the street.  Permissions (work in progress, almost done) When you install an application the Market will tell you all of the  permissions it needs to function.  These are important to read as it can  give you an idea if the application is asking for permission to do more  than it needs.  While some legitimate apps often ask for more  permission than they need, it should at least raise an eyebrow when  deciding if an application is safe and of good quality.  Again, to see  the permission given to an application after installation, go to  the  Market, press menu > downloads, then select the app, press menu   again, then press security. This list is a work in progress and by no means definitive.  It also may  contain errors or inaccuracies and I welcome any additions and  corrections. Services that cost you money make phone calls This permission is of moderate to high importance.  This could let an  application call a 1-900 number and charge you money.  However this is  not as common of a way to cheat people in today's world.  Legitimate  applications that use this include:  Google voice and... (suggestions  needed here). Services that cost  you money [[ clarification needed ]] send SMS or MMS This permission is of moderate to high importance.  This could let an  application send an SMS on your behalf, and much like the phone call  feature above, it could cost you money.  Certain SMS numbers work much  like 1-900 numbers and automatically charge your phone company money  when you send them an SMS. Storage modify/delete SD card contents This permission is of high importance.  This will allow the applications  to read, write, and delete anything stored on your phone's SD card.   This includes, pictures, videos, mp3s, and even data written to your SD  card by other applications.  However there are many legitimate uses for  this permission.  Many people want their applications to store data on  the SD card, and any application that stores information on the SD card  will need this permission.  You will have to use your own judgment and  be cautious with this permission knowing it is very powerful but very  often used by legitimate applications.  Applications that typically need  this permission include (but are not limited to): camera applications,  video applications, note taking apps, backup applications. Your personal  information read contact data This permission is of high importance.  Unless an app explicitly states a  specific feature that it would use your contact list for, there isn't  much of a reason to give an application this permission.  The one  exception to that rule includes typing or note taking applications  and/or quick-dial type applications.   Those might require your contact  information to help make suggestions to you as you type.  Typical  application that require this permission include: social networking  apps, typing/note taking apps, SMS replacement apps, contact management  apps. Your personal  information read calendar data, write calendar data This permission is of moderate to high importance. While most people  would consider their calendar information slightly less important than  their list of contacts and friends, this permission should still be  treated with care when allowing applications access. Phone calls read phone state and identity This permission is of moderate to high importance. Unfortunately this  permission seems to be a bit of a mixed bag.  While it's perfectly  normal for an application to want to know if you are on the phone or  getting a call, this permission also gives an application access to 3  unique numbers that can identify your phone.  The numbers are the IMEI,  IMSI and a 64 bit unique id that Google provides for your phone.  Some  software developers use this as a means of tracking piracy.    Additionally, any developer targeting older versions of android (1.6 and  earlier I believe) will get this permission automatically added to  their app.  Nevertheless, while this permission can be innocuous, it is  one to keep a good watch on.  As someone posted in this thread the  application Locale was caught sending this information over the  internet unencrypted to a third party -- much to to the surprise of it's  users. Your location fine (GPS) location While not a danger for stealing any of your personal information, this  will allow an application to track where you are.  Typical applications  that might need this include (but are not limited to) restaurant  directories, movie theater finders, and  mapping applications. Your location coarse (network-based) location This setting is almost identical to the above GPS location permission,  except that it is less precise when tracking your location. Network Communication create Bluetooth connection Bluetooth (Wikipedia: Bluetooth - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia) is a  technology that lets your phone communicate wirelessly over short  distances.  It is similar to Wi-fi in many ways.  It itself is not a  danger to your phone, but it does enable a way for an application to  send and receive data from other devices.  Typical applications that  would need bluetooth access include: (? need suggestions here). Network Communication full internet access This is probably the most important permission you will want to pay  attention to.  Many apps will request this but not all need it.  For any  malware to truly be effective it needs a means by which to transfer  data off of your phone, this is one of the setting it would definitely  have to ask for.  However, in this day and age of cloud computing and  always-on internet connectivity, many, many legitimate applications also  request this.  You will have to be very careful with this setting and  use your judgment.  It should always peak your interest to think about  whether your application needs this permission.  Typical applications  that would use this include but are not limited to: web browsers, social  networking applications, internet radio, cloud computing applications,  weather widgets, and many, many more. Network communication view network state, view Wi-Fi state This permission is of low importance as it will only allow an  application to tell if you are connected to the internet via 3G or  Wi-Fi. System tools Prevent phone from sleeping This is almost always harmless.  An application sometimes expects the  user to not interact with the phone directly sometimes, and as such  would need to keep the phone from going to sleep so that the user can  still use the application.  Many applications will often request this  permission.  Typical applications that use this are: Video players,  e-readers, alarm clock 'dock' views and many more. System tools Modify global system settings This permission is pretty important but only has the possibility of  moderate impact.  Global settings are pretty much anything you would  find under Android's main 'settings' window.  However there are a lot of  these setting that are perfectly reasonable for an application to want  to change.  Typical applications that would use this include: Volume  control widget, notifications, widgets, settings widgets. System tools read sync settings This permission is of low impact. It merely allows the application to  know if you have background data sync (such as for Facebook or Gmail)  turned on or off. System tools [[ clarification needed ]] Write Access Point name settings I need a bit of clarification on this setting myself.  I believe this  relates to turning on and off wifi and your 3G data network.  (if  someone can comment and clarify I would greatly appreciate it and update  this guide to reflect).   Essentially however I believe this to be  similar to the 'modify global settings' permission above. System tools automatically start at boot This permission is of low to moderate impact.  It will allow an  application to tell Android to run the application every time you start  your phone.  While not a danger in an of itself, it can point to an  applications intent. System tools [[ clarification needed ]] restart other applications This permission is of low to moderate impact. It will allow an  application to tell Android to 'kill' the process of another  application.  However that application should have the option of  immediately restarting itself. System tools retrieve running applications This permission is of moderate impact. It will allow an application to  find out what other applications are running on your phone.  While not a  danger in an of itself, it would be a useful tool for someone trying to  steal your data.  Typical legitimate applications that require this  permission include: task killers and battery history widgets. System tools set preferred applications This permission is of moderate impact. It will allow an application to  set the default application for any task in Android.  For instance  clicking on a hyperlink in your email will bring up a browser.  However  if you have more than one browser on your phone, you may want to have  one set as your 'preferred' browser.  Typical legitimate applications  that require this permission include any applications that replace,  compliment, or augment default Android functionality.   Examples of this  include web browsers, enhanced keyboards, email applications, Facebook  applications and many more. Hardware controls control vibrator This permission is of low importance (but could be lots of fun).  As it  states, it lets an app control the vibrate function on your phone.  This  includes for incoming calls and other events. Hardware controls take pictures This permission is of low importance.  As it  states, it lets an app  control the camera function on your phone.  Your accounts [[ clarification needed ]] discover known accounts This permission is of low importance.  As far as I can tell it just  tells the application if you have a Google account/Facebook account, but  doesn't tell the application anything about that account. What Does it All Mean?  This Sounds so Scary! It might sound that way but it is not, by any means, scary.  The power  of the market is actually due to the fact that developers are  free to post updates and applications much more quickly and easily.  But  despite the security risks that this model creates, there is an  incredibly powerful deterrent to malware in the community itself.  Lots  of people on these boards and in the market eagerly try out new apps and  report back the safety and quality.  Again, the community is your  best anti-virus app.
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UPDATED for Android 2.+: Android is a very powerful and very customizable OS.  Here are some tips that might help you along the way.  These definitely aren't the only way to do things, nor will they be the preferred method that people choose.  Feel free to add your suggestions to this document or put them in the comments below and I'll add them.  If you need more details send me an email through this forum. TASK MANAGERS ARE COMPLETELY UNNCESSARY. You do not need to Force Close applications on your Android phone.  Android knows when to shut down programs if you haven't properly backed out of them.  There is a built in Task Manager on Android 2.+.  Menu -> Settings -> Applications -> Running Services.  Don't force close things like voicemail, phone apps, Messages app, etc. You will miss text messages, phone calls, etc.  Great article located here. Contacts, Calendar and Google Sync: It is best to take a few minutes (or hours) plunking all your contacts into your google account online (Gmail Contacts).  In the least you can enter names and phone numbers.  You can also easily add several phones, several email addresses, home postal addresses, birthdays, etc.  You can import contacts into google contacts several ways and from several different programs....Just export your contacts using a .CSV file and then import into Gmail contacts.  Gmail Contacts also automatically detects duplicate contacts so you can keep your contacts clean.  The HTC Hero or Evo will also sync with your MS exchange contacts as well.  As you add new contacts to your phone, make them "google" contacts under type of contact.  These will automatically sync with your Android powered phone (Menu -> Settings -> Accounts and Sync).  The reason you want to use this method is that it will always be backed up in case you A) lose your phone, B) damage your phone or C) have to update your phone.  Doing this now will save you tons of time in the future.  (As a bonus, you can SMS and call people directly from Gmail).  Inorder for this to work seamlessly, you must have the background data synchronization turned on (Menu -> Settings -> Accounts and Sync).  You may choose to update these items yourself manually and save a ton of battery life, but then you wouldn't be using the best feature of a google Android phone. To exit an application use the "back arrow" hardkey until you back out of the application.  Hitting the "home" key will leave the app running in the background, which is okay if you are going to be using it frequently.  Android will close this application when it needs to free up RAM.  It is good to get in the practice of backing out of apps rather than hitting the home key. Calibrate your keyboard and accelerometer. Menu -> settings -> Language & Keyboard -> Touch Input -> Text Input -> Calibration Tool Remove saved words from your dictionary: If you add words to your dictionary on accident like "di" instead of "if" or "do" then you can erase all saved words in your dictionsary, you can also remove single words from the list of remembered words.  Menu -> settings -> Language & Keyboard -> Touch Input -> User Dictionary.  Then you can add and remove words as necessary. If you can't find options first try "Menu" hardkey, then try long pressing on it. MicroSD cards are used to store information, the HTC Hero and Samsung Moment came with a 2GB microSD card stock, the HTC Evo4G comes with an 8GB card already.  In Android 2.2+ you are able to run some of your applications directly off your SD Card (that's up to the developer, don't expect to move them all over automatically.....a good app for this is SDmove).  Currently the Samsung Moment, HTC Hero and HTC Evo4G all support up to 32GB microSD cards.  The best cards to get are that of "class 6" rating.  (it will have a little 6 within a circle on it).  8GB class 6 cards are ~ 15-20 bucks on amazon.com.  32GB Micro SDHC cards are very expensive still. File Browsers:  ASTRO File Manager is a free (currently) application in the Android Market.  You can use a file manager to manager your files on your SD card directly from your phone.  This will allow you to copy, paste, delete, rename, or create folders, files and directories like you would from your desktop or laptop computer.  This particular app also has a utility to back up your applications to your SD card (again, the apps can't run off your SD card, they are just stored there).  This is a handy feature when you need to do factory resets OR firmware upgrades.  Another handy backup application is BookmarkBR which makes a backup file of your Browser applications web bookmarks.  Before firmware upgrades it is recommended to back up these items.  You may also find a program that will backup your SMS and MMS messages if they are needed after firmware or factory resets.  Your emails are held on the server and will repopulate after you update or reset your phone. Any MP3 can be made into a ringer by using the built in HTC ringtone trimmer or Ringdroid (which is a more complete app that allows better fine tuning).  Alternatively, one can just search an App like "Zedge" which has tons of free ringtones and wallpapers.  Tip: Make three folders somewhere on your SD card named "ringers", "notifications" and "alarms".  Then place your ringers, etc. into the appropriate folders.  This will make them appear in the Notifications sounds when you are setting a specific ringtone.  You can manage your SD card from your phone by using Astro File Manager (Market) or by plugging it into a computer and mounting it as a disk drive (see above). Managing music: connect your Android phone to a PC and select USB Connected, then Mount SD Card.  This will mount your phone's SD card like a flash or thumb drive on your computer.  You can just drag and drop MP3s or other formats directly on to your SD card anywhere and the Music app will recognize it. If you want to organize your music it might make it easier to add and remove in the future.  When finished make sure to "Turn off USB storage" before disconnecting the device. Downloading / Removing apps from the Android Market: You can easily add apps from the market by following the installation instructions.  If you ever want to remove an application, go to the Android Market -> downloads section and remove the app using this method.  There are other ways to remove applications, this (I feel) is the best so it is off your account).  If you have paid for an app and you want to remove it (after the 24 hour refund time) you will be able to reinstall the application free of charge as long as you use the same google account on the phone.  Periodically you can check for application updates by visiting the Android Market -> Downloads section.  It is good to read the release notes on the application updates.  Some updates will only add advertising to the application, which can be an annoyance. Rountinely Clearing the Cache on your phone: If your phone appears to be sluggish or running out of room.  You can go into Menu -> Settings -> Applications -> Manage Applications.  Once the list populates (may take a while), you can order them by size.  Clearing the cache on the apps that are consuming the most ROM and RAM is a good idea occasionally.  The two apps that have the biggest caches are the Browser and Albums.  Clearing the cache frees up memory and may improve the speed of your phone.  It also doesn't hurt to reboot the phone once a week to clean out the memory.  Warning, by "Force Closing" apps that are crucial to the OS in this section of Manage Applications you can cause your phone to miss text messages, alarms, etc.  Don't Force Close the app unless you know exactly what that application does. Holding down the "Home" key (while in apps or not) will give you a list of the last 6 - 8 applications that are either open or were open.  This allows you to quickly switch between them to take advantage of the multitaksing of the phone. When in your browser, holding the "back arrow" key will bring up your history which makes it easier to find cached webpages. Google Search by Voice: you can long press the search key when on your home screen and it will bring up the google voice search that will search the web, you can also access applications, say things like "call: John Doe Mobile" or "Navigate to McDonald's".  Quick press the key for the text search option.....you can easily search the web, applications, people, etc..  In certain applications, you can use the search key to find things within that application.  Example: you can search your installed applications quickly when in your app drawer. Copy and Paste:  you can copy and paste text by long pressing on that item.  This works very well in the HTC Mail application and browser.  This currently does not work with the Gmail application.  On the Evo, copy and paste also gives you other options, you can highlight a word or string of words and then search that word, look up a definition, or copy to clipboard. Factory Data Reset: Warning, back up all your data first before doing this.  This will wipe all your data and return the phone to the original factory state. This can be performed by going through the menus to reset the data (Menu -> Settings -> Privacy -> factory data reset -> Reset Phone -> Erase everything) OR by the key stroke method (for HTC Hero only): Power the device OFF. Press and hold the Home and Back Arrow buttons.  While holding these buttons, press and hold the End Call button.  Release End Call, Home and Back arrow buttons and press the Trackball once to execute the Hard Reset.  You should see some skateboarding android robots. Follow the prompts to clear the data and reset the device.  The device will reboot once the process is complete. ***Many HTC Hero users are reporting that before they upgrade to 2.1, they first hard reset 1.5, skip the set up steps, then flash the new 2.1 RUU -- this apparently can improve some fuctions, however in my experience both Heroes I've had work wonderfully without doing this***  Hard reset to clear the Dalvik cache. To reset the Evo properly: Turn the power off. If your HTC EVO 4G is frozen, pull the battery out and reinsert it Hold the Volume Down button Press and release the Power button You are now presented with a menu that allows for Fastbook, Recovery, Clear Storage, and Simlock Select Clear Storage by pressing the Volume Down button Press and release the Power button Now simply confirm your decision: Volume Up for YES and Volume Down for NO 
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