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Sprint and HTC announce the HTC EVO 4G LTE

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Journeyman

Sprint and HTC announce the HTC EVO 4G LTE

This thing looks super sexy and has some great added features that the rest of the One X line-up was missing. Coming out Q2 for $199. Pre-orders start May 7th.

http://www.engadget.com/2012/04/04/htc-evo-4g-lte-preview-video/

20 REPLIES 20
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Master

You can also visit Sprint site to get more info on this device. http://www.sprint.com/landings/evo4glte/index.html?ECID=vanity:evo4glte

Abe

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Journeyman

Thanks Abe, I didn't mean to stray people away from the official site, I just didn't think it would be up so quickly and I'm on limited internet use so I can't go scouring for such things while at work as easily.

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Journeyman

I think they really improved over much of the problems with the One X save battery.  The continueing trend towards thin devices at the expense of good batteries is troublesome and the new Evo only has 2000 mA battery that is non-removeable to boot.  So assuming this some how makes it through a full day of standard to heavy useage on a mere 2000 battery, what is the replacement policy when 14 months into your 2 year contract after the battery has degraded substantially?

Between the Razormax, the Galaxy Note, and the 2100 REMOVEABLE battery for the Nexus you would figure HTC would recognize journalists care about style but users care about functionality.    It is a shame too because HTC nailed every other consideration in my opinion.  Easily accessible low light camera - check, 4.7" 720p screen-check, kickstand - check.... removeable SD is nice but removeable battery is a must unless they offer >=3000mah embedded battery with a mid contract replacement $40 deal due to battery degradation.

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Journeyman

The battery is a li-po battery, not li-ion. So degradtion shouldn't be an issue in the amount of 2 years and even beyond.

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Journeyman

It is great that HTC is remembering who put them on the map, Sprint Customers.  But my biggest grip is how we are being feed the whole 4G LTE.   Its a repeat of the original EVO 4G.  They are feeding us (Sprint) the same thing again, phones with 4G capability but no coverage...  rolleyes.  This really need to stop!  In the spirit of a loyal sprint customer I will end on a good note.  There is no perfect US carrier but hands down Sprint is the best with it unlimited data plan.  I look forward to greater things from Sprint and HTC.  

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Journeyman

"... being fed the whole 4G LTE... It's a repeat of the original EVO 4G"

That is exactly what I thought. I was very pissed about having to pay an extra $10 for a service that literally did not exist.

Now, seems they are doing the exact same thing.

There is no plans whatsoever for 4G to come to my town "San Diego" and I'm not holding my breath. I will CERTAINLY not pay another extra $240 for the life of the contract for the "priveledge" of using the non-existant 4G service.

Now, for the phone. A non-replacable battery is absolutely killer. Sometimes you must change batteries.

If you are going to say that this battery will actually work then fine, I'll wait until I see it. But I would not expect any battery to last 2 years in any phone so therefore it MUST be removable.

I am very, VERY frustrated right now. Sprint is "my carrier" and so I'm stuck with them. I want to keep them.

But I must have a top of the line, up to date, powerful phone. Any compromise is a compromise I must live with for two years and so simply will not do it.

I think I'll be going off contract for a while if this is what Sprint is going to offer.

I'll hold out for the Galaxy S3 or some copy of the Note.

While off-contract you can bet your booty I'll be shopping around.

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Journeyman

There are certainly plans for LTE to be launched in San Diego. Should google for the road map that was shown a few days ago.

As for the battery, again, it's a li-po battery. I'd be surprised if it doesn't last 4-5 years. There may certainly be a few bad ones here and the but there won't be a mass amount to go dead 2 years from now.

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Journeyman

I have an OG Evo 4g currently and I often go through 2 stock batteries a day (with Wimax off).  The original battery charge lasts about half what the secondary battery does.  That is some light browsing and some reading but I do not really play games on it or anything that is a traditional battery drain.  So my battery concerns are 2 fold.  First 2000 is not enough to last a full day and even if the battery is 90% at the end of 2 years then it is effectively an 1800 at that time which is no where near enough.

THey spent way to many calories trying to impress tech journalists who care about how slim a device looks and not how average users get through their day.  As it stands, the HTC screen may be better, the HTC camera is definetly better, I like the kickstand and expandable memory slot but frankly a 2600 (as rumored) non removeable battery would point me to the Nexus over the HTC.  A 2000 that cannot be swapped on a heavy useage day is just a disaster. 

May I suggest their testing regimine inlcude 2+ hours of reading, 1 hour of browsing, 30 minutes of texting, 2 hours of audio only (music or podcasts).  If the phone cannot make it through that every day on a single charge and have the battery last 2 years at the useage model, it is inadequate.  Non-removeable is just a design flaw anyway, I would much rather replace a battery than an entire phone and even if the battery lasts 2 days on a charge, having a spare is very comforting when traveling.

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Journeyman

The EVO 4G had a 1500mAh battery with a snapdragon S1 and WiMAX. This has a 2000mAh battery with a Snapdragon S4 and LTE. I think I read that the S4 uses up to 30% less power than the S3, which had many power-saving advantages over the S2, which had many power-saving advantages over the S1. LTE uses less power than WiMAX, so you're also saving battery there. So not only does it have a larger battery than the EVO 4G, but many of the internals use a lot less power than their EVO 4G counterparts.

Here is what Engadget had to say in terms of battery life for the One X (same screen being the matching factor here):

Battery life, however, looks likely to pay the price for this. With brightness set to 50 percent, WiFi on but not connected, the One X's 1,800mAh juicepack managed six hours of continuous video playback -- that's two hours short of its sibling, the One S. Obviously, this sort of activity is likely to use the phone's multiple cores, but we found that Tegra 3's 4-PLUS-1 setup still continues to slurp the battery on very light use -- we didn't notice that extra companion core taking any sort of burden off the phone's power consumption. Checking our battery status, it seems like HTC's Super LCD 2 screen -- perhaps unsurprisingly-- was also to blame for a life span that didn't last a full workday.


To clarify, we got 12-plus hours of moderate use out of the One X (that's checking, email and social networks, making a few calls, sending some messages, taking a few pictures, downloading a few apps); your mileage will vary. Keep in mind there are differences between the One X and One S beyond the processor, such as like the radio chipset and the display (4.7-inch vs. 4.3, 720p vs qHD, LCD vs. AMOLED).

And here is what they had to say about the One S (same processor being the matching factor here):

The One S comes with a very middling 1,650mAh battery but performance betrayed those numbers. We hit just over eight and a half hours of constant video playback during our typical rundown test -- 2.5 hours more than its sibling, the HTC One X. This was at 50 percent brightness, with WiFi on (but not connected), and email and Twitter set to fetch updates at regular intervals. This pegs it at around the same lifespan as the iPhone 4S when it comes to video playback, although it doesn't quite match the bigger-screened Galaxy Note. Then again, it doesn't have the same 2,200mAh battery store to draw on. In more standard use, the phone lasted through our daily grind, including emails, web browsing sessions every two hours or so, some Spotify playback and a handful of voice calls and text messages. Charging the One S was still a daily ritual.

Take that as you will, but also remember that the EVO has 200 and 350 more mAh. The fact that they got six hours of continuous videp playback on the One X is impecible in my opinion.

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Sprint Product Ambassador

Remember, the Evo 4G LTE is running the latest Qualcomm Snapdragon S4 MSM8960 chipset with LTE, GPS, CDMA and WiFi -- far better battery life than older chipsets.  AnandTech notes that "The move to 28nm and a second generation of cellular basebands has generally been heralded as being the answer to our battery life issues, particularly with LTE."  They also note that the chipset is the smoothest running Android 4 experience they've seen.

28nm is the trace-width on the CPU; the Tegra chipset on the quad-core phone is still at 40nm.  The smaller the lines on the cpu, the less power it takes to drive the chip.

Lower power plus faster (far faster!) -- wow!

http://www.droid-life.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/02/snapdragon-s4-linpack.png

Really looking forward to this phone!

-

Product Ambassador, long time Sprint employee
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Journeyman

super sexy? the evo 4g lte i have to many monikers in my name phone? this is the ugliest thing ever. The HTC One X was sexy.. its a beautiful well designed phone. But for some reason Sprint felt the need to throw away all that design time & effort htc did and make it look like an old phone from 2 years ago. Oh yeah and they can't let go of that name evo either. This is assinine. The One X was perfect, why mess with it sprint? why????????

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