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T-Mobile HTC HD2 supports free unlimited laptop tethering by default why EVO does not?

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Journeyman

T-Mobile HTC HD2 supports free unlimited laptop tethering by default why EVO does not?

Even in the cities where T-Mobile has HSPA+ which is as fast as WiMAX.

You can not say "because 4G is 10 times faster then their 3G" or "because HD2 is very different beast then EVO"

Message was edited by: EVOill

45 REPLIES 45
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Journeyman

Read page 147 of HTC EVO handbook.  It gives instructions to set it up.  Some on here will still say your shouldnt because its against Terms and Conditions of your Sprint account.  If they didnt want you to use it then it should be set up for it.  After all the handbook has the Sprint logo all over it and essentially is their document.  And you dont even have to root your phone to do it.  Knock yourself out.

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Wizard

EVOill wrote:

Even in the cities where T-Mobile has HSPA+ which is as fast as WiMAX.

You can not say "because 4G is 10 times faster then their 3G" or "because HD2 is very different beast then EVO"

Message was edited by: EVOill

Maybe you could point to where T-mobile says that tethering is included?  The T-mobile Terms and Conditions includes:

Your Data Plan is intended for Web browsing, messaging, and similar  activities on your device and not on any other equipment. Unless  explicitly permitted by your Data Plan, other uses, including for  example, tethering your device to a personal computer or other hardware,  are not permitted.

http://www.t-mobile.com/Templates/Popup.aspx?WT.z_unav=ftr__TC&PAsset=Ftr_Ftr_TermsAndConditions&print=true

I cannot find anywhere that the plan that appears to be the most inclusive, "Even More Plus", includes tethering.  Nor can I find a T-mobile plan add-on that allows tethering on the HD2.  Could you please direct me to one or the other?

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Journeyman

Easily. Go here

http://forums.t-mobile.com/t5/Internet-Connection-Sharing/bd-p/PhoneAsModem

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Journeyman

dayvedayve6689 wrote:

Read page 147 of HTC EVO handbook.  It gives instructions to set it up.  Some on here will still say your shouldnt because its against Terms and Conditions of your Sprint account.  If they didnt want you to use it then it should be set up for it.  After all the handbook has the Sprint logo all over it and essentially is their document.  And you dont even have to root your phone to do it.  Knock yourself out.

That feature is blocked by the Sprint and tethering of even single device over USB is $30 additional. That's insanity of epic proportions. The notorious $10 EVO "better experience" overcharge looks  like a joke in comparison

Of course you can hack and tether your devices using third party software which will cost you $10-20 as one time payment, but may end up with fines from Sprint.

Message was edited by: EVOill

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Wizard

EVOill wrote:

Easily. Go here

http://forums.t-mobile.com/t5/Internet-Connection-Sharing/bd-p/PhoneAsModem

Your link goes to a forum directory.  How about a direct link to an official statement by T-mobile that tethering is included, since the T-mobile Terms and Conditions appear to prohibit it?

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Journeyman

Okay... This is getting really freaking weird. Let's try THIS: I got my EVO directly from Sprint, so I didn't "sign" anything. There is a copy of the service agreement: general terms and  conditions of service. Thirty some pages of stuff, then, on the last page is the "Important Message From Sprint". It goes like this: "This device is an 'open' device. What that means is that you are free to use it to access the Intetnet as you see fit. You may go to websites you like and you may download or use applications or software that you choose."  Doesn't that pretty much settle all this chatter about what is and isn't allowed? "...as you see fit." Not, as Sprint sees fit! Doesn't that pretty much say "Go for it mother***er"?  -Sharon

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Wizard

carolinagirl.sharon wrote:

Okay... This is getting really freaking weird. Let's try THIS: I got my EVO directly from Sprint, so I didn't "sign" anything. There is a copy of the service agreement: general terms and  conditions of service. Thirty some pages of stuff, then, on the last page is the "Important Message From Sprint". It goes like this: "This device is an 'open' device. What that means is that you are free to use it to access the Intetnet as you see fit. You may go to websites you like and you may download or use applications or software that you choose."  Doesn't that pretty much settle all this chatter about what is and isn't allowed? "...as you see fit." Not, as Sprint sees fit! Doesn't that pretty much say "Go for it?  -Sharon

If, instead of stopping when you saw words you could interpret that way, you had continued to read that "Important Messages From Sprint" page, you would have realized that the context of the statement that you quoted was in fact a warning, that Sprint has no control over web sites you visit or software you download, and you do both at your own risk.  Sprint was not saying, "We give you permission to do whatever you want with your phone on our network, even if it violates the Terms and Conditions or the law"; they were informing you of the risks of unfiltered websites and an open software market that includes apps that were not tested or approved by anyone.  The Terms and Conditions (and laws) still apply.

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Journeyman

I'm not real sure I can agree with your assessment. Can Sprint really have it both ways? Telling me I can use my handset as I see fit and then revoking that right when it when it interferes with their desire to control the environment of an open platform would be talking out of both sides of their mouth at once. To say they have no responsibility for what I see fit to do and then say I can't do what I see fit to do is contradictory at best. Contradictions are the stuff of extended litigation. They are closing the barn do after the horses have gotten out.

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Wizard

carolinagirl.sharon wrote:

I'm not real sure I can agree with your assessment. Can Sprint really have it both ways? Telling me I can use my handset as I see fit and then revoking that right when it when it interferes with their desire to control the environment of an open platform would be talking out of both sides of their mouth at once. To say they have no responsibility for what I see fit to do and then say I can't do what I see fit to do is contradictory at best. Contradictions are the stuff of extended litigation. They are closing the barn do after the horses have gotten out.

Again, instead of forcing your desired interpretation into the words you read, understand the context.  Sprint sells you communication services, including data access.  The amount of data in most plans is unlimited.  However, Sprint places restrictions on the use of, and methods of access to, that data. For example, among other restrictions, Sprint prohibits: the use of tethering without paying for a tethering or hotspot plan; the use of the Sprint network in connection with making Denial of Service attacks or the sending of spam; and the operation of a server or unattended webcam on the Sprint network.  Now, on the page that you excerpted, Sprint is warning you that, despite using your phone within those and the other restrictions,  they do not control, prescreen, or approve apps available on the market, other software you can download, or web sites you can access, and they take no responsibility for what you access or download.  Since Sprint has no control over those abilities, even if you operate your phone within the restrictions, Sprint is telling you to use caution to avoid downloading viruses or other harmful software, and to be aware that you might navigate to a website that contains material you find objectional or automatically downloads harmful software.

In summary, Sprint is saying (1) there are some things we don't allow you to do; but (2) even if you don't do those things, there is a whole wide world of stuff you can do with your phone, so please be careful, and don't come crying to us if you happen to see porn or download a program that does something bad.

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Journeyman

Since Androids tethering are not yet done by T-Mobile by some reason the Agreement states that the tethering is not allowed unless it is supported by specific plan/phone combination. So if you call and ask them, they tells you explicitly it is allowed on any standard $25 fee Intrernet plan with WinMO (like HD2) and Blackberry. smartphones.

Why they don't publicize that anywhere? Could be it was too much headache to them to support tethering on all phone/PC combination if they will claim that in Agreement. Cold be they are lazy and do not care much about several percents of high-tech customers. Could be that it is their secret plan to destroy competitors while they sleep all together . On HD2 for example tethering become so easy so it's just one click away like with usual Ethernet

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Journeyman

Heard also on Engadget that Palm Pre had free unlimited tethering. Can anyone confirm?

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