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Failed and COSTLY Ice Cream Sandwich update and Swype fix (Epic 4G Touch Samsung Galaxy S2)

Journeyman

Re: Failed and COSTLY Ice Cream Sandwich update and Swype fix (Epic 4G Touch Samsung Galaxy S2)

well, Putrwiz001, you sound like a 14 year old who discovered Libertarian values and can't wait to tell everyone your'e one of them.

The fact is, we should not have to search the web, i.e, it is not unreasonable to expect that it is ok to follow the instructions of a supplier we pay a monthly service fee to, let alone a company that at one time was the top supoplier of wiireless services to commercial and government service companies, NexTel.

Sprint SHOULD have a simple rollback option for the absurdity of this update. As I stated, and many others are confirming, battery life has gone from 8-12 hours to 4-5, AND far worse, the reception/radio function of the phone has gone from poor to externsively non-esixtent. Remember that this is first and foremost a PHONE. If I can't make calls, and it is due to an update, and the company offers no rollback to the previous release, then the company is no longer reputable and we all need to jump ship. The problem is this, it is not that easy to do so becuae they hold our phone number captive, so yes, we could walk and let them come after up for baklances due, but they would have the contractual rights to retain our number until we could sue them.

So keep your head in your world of idealism, while the rest of us try to make a living down here on Earth. Let me guess, you wolk for a company or government and you can fiddle with fixing your PC or Phone all day, go home at night as though you did something productive that day, and still expect a paycheck.

Journeyman

Re: Failed and COSTLY Ice Cream Sandwich update and Swype fix (Epic 4G Touch Samsung Galaxy S2)

I just tried to install the beta version, it says it installed but I still keep getting this error message (Open to EnglishUS failed!). I'm assuming it's because I have the old version of Swype on my phone. The problem is, I just went through ALL of my apps and Swype isn't even listed there so I can't uninstall the old one.

Journeyman

Re: Failed and COSTLY Ice Cream Sandwich update and Swype fix (Epic 4G Touch Samsung Galaxy S2)

ChrisAmanda13, I stumbled upon what I think may be a fix for the e-mail glitch: open the e-mail app>select menu>select "Font size">select "Normal". This fixed my e-mail glitch. I subsequently changed my font back to "Small" (just my font preference). As for the Swype glitch. When in an active text box with the keyboard open, I pulled down the notifications bar and selected "Select input method", I selected "Swype" and I got the "Open to EnglishUS failed!" error. To fix this I went back to my home screen and went to Menu>Settings>Applications>select the "All" tab>scroll down and select "Swype", then I clicked the "Clear data" button and then "Force stop" button. Then I went back an active text box with the keyboard open, I pulled down the notifications bar and selected "Select input method", I selected "Swype". It took a few seconds and the Swype keyboard opened up.

I hope this solves your problems with your phone.

Journeyman

Re: Failed and COSTLY Ice Cream Sandwich update and Swype fix (Epic 4G Touch Samsung Galaxy S2)

ChrisAmanda13,

Thanks for your inquiry.  Your original Swype may have been removed by the beta Swype installation.  I avoided installing the beta version creating, with the Sprint Tech Mike's help, the fix described in my original post.  You may simply need to go through the steps detailed by SteelerSue in post 27  following your beta Swype installation.  This seems to be the most common and successful solution IF you still have Swype as an ACTIVE/INSTALLED app following the ICS update. 

If this does not work for your beta Swype installation, and you want to investigate further the possibility that the original/native Swype is still installed and causing trouble, then you might want to look for the native Swype as an INACTIVE/UNINSTALLED app that is listed at the BOTTOM of the alphabetical listing of ACTIVE/INSTALLED apps.  See my original post, steps 1-17 for a more detailed description.

Good luck.

Journeyman

Re: Failed and COSTLY Ice Cream Sandwich update and Swype fix (Epic 4G Touch Samsung Galaxy S2)

LowTechLucy,

Thanks for your reply, and you're very welcome for my expressed opinions.  I love the new free speech that the internet has brought to Earth's public square!  As a former iPhone user, I'm very interested in your thoughts regarding the larger Android and mobile computing industry/community issues that I've attempted to raise in my earlier posts.

It's disheartening to hear of the additional problems, bugs and issues that you and others have been struggling with following the ICS update.  Good luck to you as you look for solutions.

BTW: I loved your reference to the Thumperian principle.  I, too, was raised with the same as my bread and butter, as well as the "silence is golden" principle.  Often, saying nothing is the most powerful way of saying something.  Wonderful parents are the greatest assets a person can ever have!

Journeyman

Re: Failed and COSTLY Ice Cream Sandwich update and Swype fix (Epic 4G Touch Samsung Galaxy S2)

Denlee1,

Sorry to hear of your frustrations.  If it's any consolation, many in the user community share them, and some are working constructively to provide the fixes that Sprint, Samsung and Google should be supplying in lieu of a properly functioning system update.  Please see SteelerSue's procedure in post 27 and/or steps 1-17 in my original post for possible solutions to your Swype problems. 

Good luck.

Journeyman

Re: Failed and COSTLY Ice Cream Sandwich update and Swype fix (Epic 4G Touch Samsung Galaxy S2)

Actually, GalSII, I work for a company where I am way too busy to spend the day fixing my pc or my phone.  However, I am smart enough to know that any major update (like changing to a new version of the android operating system) is going to have issues.  So I will check the internet (which took less than 5 minutes to do) to see what problems other people have first, and wait until the weekend to do the update, when I will have time to fix any problems that come up, without interfering with my job.

Nobody made any of you, that are complaining about sprint and samsung, do the update.  If your phone was working fine before, then there is no reason to update as soon as it appears on your phone.  I didn't see any features in this update that were so important that it had to be done immediately.  And clicking OK to do the update is not following Sprint's instructions.  Did they tell you that you had to update?  No.  A message came up on your phone telling you an update was available and asking if it was ok to install it.  If you clicked OK at that point, it is because you made the choice to update, not because you were instructed to.

In a perfect (ideal) world, the update would work perfectly, or there would be a rollback function.  Since this is not a perfect world, it is unreasonable to assume that a brand new update (which is done by Samsung, not Sprint) is going to be perfect.  I have never seen a major update to any phone that worked perfectly on every phone.  There are too many variations in hardware and software involved for them to be perfect.  That is why the SMART thing to do is check out what other people say about it first, and wait to do the update, until a time when you will not have to miss work and lose income if it doesn't all go perfectly.  But, if you are one of those people who have to have something right away, then you should be prepared for things like this to happen.  The bottom line is that you assumed there wouldn't be any problems with the update and then chose to install it right away.  You were wrong, and now you have to deal with it.

And sprint is not the only carrier that has these kinds of issues.  I have seen similar issues with other cell phone carriers, and other brands of phones.

Journeyman

Re: Failed and COSTLY Ice Cream Sandwich update and Swype fix (Epic 4G Touch Samsung Galaxy S2)

right now, this thread is basically a support group for this botched 'update/upgrade.'

when i was on the phone with *2, they told me that they were unaware of the MTP (mounting) issue - which is a biggie.  although i have my contacts and calendar backed up via "mark/space missing sync," i am unable to load it back onto my phone b/c the app crashes and, as said before, the phone won't mount/communicate via USB/WIFI to load the contacts back on...

their solution was to send me another GS2.  theoretically it will not have the FF18 curse on it b/c it has been 'off' for a while...  now, i just hope my wife won't mistakingly say "ok," if it prompts her to update.

tonite, a *2 rep said that she, too, has the GS2, but has held off on the update b/c of all that she has been hearing.  she said that 'samsung' is attempting to find fixes, etc...

(gosh.  i thought the dreaded PALM PRE days were over!  ... guess we will always have this trash to deal with.)

"mlbp," thanks again for your post.  i can only take comfort in knowing that it wasn't only me that was spending hours and hours resetting/wiping the phone - hoping that if they couldn't magically get the lost time back, they would at least have a slick, working, phone.

Sprint:  ugh.

Journeyman

Re: Failed and COSTLY Ice Cream Sandwich update and Swype fix (Epic 4G Touch Samsung Galaxy S2)

Putrwiz001,

Thank you for the time and effort that you've invested in this discussion. As a 20 year representative of the computer industry, you speak with some authority. Please see my responses in the bold/italicized items below.

Jul 19, 2012 3:31 PM (in response to mlbp) Re: Failed and COSTLY Ice Cream Sandwich update and Swype fix (Epic 4G Touch Samsung Galaxy S2)

You should send the bill to whoever hit OK in answer to the update message. Oh right, that would be you. If the update had happened without you approving it, you might have a valid complaint, but nobody forced you to do the update, and maybe you should have done some reading about it on the internet before clicking on Ok.

Please see my earlier post, #15, for my response to the legalistic End User License Agreement (EULA) argument.

Again, many legal judgments across many industries uphold, over EULAs, corporate liability disclaimers and the like, the consumer's right to expect that a vendor's products and services will cause them no harm.  At the end of the day, users pay Sprint to provide mobile services so that they, the users, do NOT have to second guess and double check the quality and potential harmfulness of Sprint's products and services.  I suspect that most mobile computing users have more productive ways to spend their time.  Also, who among the user community would you have perform the first update installations so as to provide all other users with internet reports on whether or not the update will cause injury or loss?  Such testing is primarily the responsibility of the VENDORS NOT the consumers.

Perhaps yet another analogy will better illustrate the concern that I have with the “blame the victim” arguments that you and others make.  Again, drawing from the medical industry, should you or a loved one ever be in need of surgery, it is accepted practice that the surgeon or other health care professional first describes to you, in explicit, understandable and quite detailed terms, the percentage likelihoods that you will experience one or more harm(s) as a consequence of “clicking OK” to proceed with the surgery.  Additionally, you would, except in the case of emergency surgeries, usually be informed of the risk potentials of your procedure well in advance of the date of your surgery, so that you would have time to consider your desire to accept the risks of the procedure well before the surgeon slices into your tissues.

When and where in the mobile computing industry have you ever seen such  frank and quantitative risk assessments being provided to users PRIOR to a firmware/software update or product/service launch?  If such assessments were demanded by the mobile computing community and were provided by upstanding, ethical vendors, users could make more intelligent, INFORMED risk/benefit choices BEFORE “clicking OK” to accept the risks and benefits of an update, new product/service, etc. 

I believe our time is better spent discussing questions like this, rather than assigning blame and responsibility to injured parties in ways that would not be accepted or tolerated in other industries.  Consider the likely outcomes if the Sprint user community had been informed, well in advance of the ICS update, that their risks of harm included:

            X% chance of losing Swype functionality, and

            Y% chance of losing 30% or more battery life, and

            Z% chance of losing 50% or more phone signal, and

            A% chance of losing 50% or more G4 signal, and

            (Fill in here with all the other credible and significant reports of ICS update bugs).

I am confident that, in this scenario, I and a great many other users would have chosen to forgo the benefits of ICS specifically in order to avoid one or more of the above risks.  Such full and quantitative disclosure of firmware update risk assessments would provide the additional benefit of providing vendors with strong economic incentives to hold release of updates until risk profiles have been reduced to levels that would assure that the vast majority of users would choose to implement the update.

If your phone is that important to your job, then doing an update in the morning before work is not a very smart idea, and is your own fault.

In my original post I believe I took appropriate responsibility for the negative consequences of the ICS update when I described my actions as naive.  I will continue to assert, however, that the bulk of the responsibility for the consequences of the flawed ICS update resides with Sprint.  Again, this argument amounts to “blame the victim” for the resulting harm.

In addition, since you seem to be an intelligent, if misguided person, whose phone is obviously very important to their business, you should not need to be told to backup your data and apps before doing an update of the operating system.

Please see my post #15 for my backup practices and the irrelevance of backup state to this discussion.  If you have been a computer industry professional for 20 years, I have been performing computer backups for 10 years longer than you have been in the profession.  I have always and will always perform appropriate backups on all my computer systems.  Indeed, my livelihood and my clients’ business interests are critically dependant on my doing so.

It looks like all of your lost time and wages could have been completely avoided, if you had just not clicked on OK.

Please see my earlier post, #15, for my response to the legalistic End User License Agreement (EULA) argument and my comments above regarding EULAs and “blame the victim” arguments.

And after seeing all of yours posts (in all of the different threads) on here about this, it looks like you lost more time by complaining about something that you caused yourself, than you lost due to the problems the update caused you.

I had no hand in causing harm to myself from Sprint's ICS update, beyond the "clicking OK" to initiate the update and EULA discussions above.

 

My time is mine to invest where, when and to whatever extent I choose.  I have not invested my time in this thread merely to vent my spleen regarding the injuries that I, my family, my business and my clients' businesses have sustained as a consequence of Sprint's botched ICS update.  Rather, I have attempted to use these losses, along with those of others, to attempt to raise larger mobile computing industry/community questions that may, one day, improve the mobile computing experience for all. As someone much wiser than me once said: "I am interested only in the future, for that is where I expect to spend the rest of my days."  One day, when you are my age, you may find that you desire to invest significant amounts of your personal time in efforts to make a brighter future for those that will follow you.  Until that day, please do not pass judgment on the volunteerism investment choices of others.

I have been working in the computer industry for over 20 years, and software updates almost always have bugs associated with them. No update can be tested against every possible phone configuration and combination of installed applications that people have.

So, you would argue that sufficient release testing and quality controls need NOT be performed in the mobile computing industry because they are too difficult or costly compared to other industries that are required to perform adequate release and quality control testing?  As a long-standing representative of medical techology industries I can assure you, in the strongest possible terms, that such testing and control is far from impossible for the mobile computing industry.

 

As a 20 year veteran of the computer industry, you must surely be aware that the vast majority of release testing and quality control assessment is a purely statistical endeavor.  One rarely has the luxury of 100% non-destructive testing of products or services before release to market.  The most ethical, pragmatic and economically viable approach is to define test samples that are representative of a product’s most likely final use configurations, and then to test those configurations with realistic use scenarios to identify significant failure modes, error rates and other performance issues.

As you are surely aware, most good product design incorporates several iterations of design, testing and redesign, specifically to reduce and/or eliminate significant failure modes, errors, bugs, etc. BEFORE release of products to unsuspecting and innocent users.  Now, however, we have hijacked the conversation into a tutorial on quality design and quality control principles and procedures, and I am sure that most readers are in no need of such.

Specifically because product performance testing and quality control is expensive, it is incumbent upon industry, consumers and regulators to define acceptable levels of performance and quality control testing, and their associated costs, and which portion of those costs will be borne by industry and by the consumer.  In today’s marketplace, mobile computing consumers too often accept the false reality of being helpless victims at the hands of vendors who minimize full beta testing and quality control costs by shifting a large portion of those costs to the user community.  This tacit complicity between “victim” users and cost-avoiding vendors is simple enabling behavior.  Such “victim” behavior by consumers provides significant cost savings to vendors, and in the process, encourages vendors to repeat the exercise, seeking yet higher cost-shifts to consumers in the next cycle of product development.  Until the mobile computing consumer refuses to be victimized in this way, vendors have no incentive to accept their appropriate portion of performance and quality control testing costs.

For the record, I have spent a large portion of my career defining system design requirements, release tests and quality control standards for complex medical device, diagnostic and chemical measurement systems.  I too speak with some technical authority on these matters.  Additionally, after 30 years industrial experience, I can say, without hesitation, that it is in YOUR private and professional interests to use YOUR authority as a computer professional to stand squarely on the side of ethical performance testing and quality control cost sharing between your profession and your consumer base.  To do otherwise is “cutting your nose of to spite your face.”

I haven't had any of the problems you did (I am sure it is because I use different apps than you do, or have different settings than you do), so if it was tested on my phone, there would not have been any problems.

I’m not sure what point you are attempting to make here.  Given the sheer volume of very significant and dramatic performance issues reported by intelligent users (yes some of us have more than 2 neurons in use at any given time), it was fall-off-a-log child’s play for Sprint’s, Samsung’s and Google’s computer and electronics professionals to identify appropriate testing configurations, procedures and quality control and product release requirements, and the resources needed to adequately generate the same.  That said, I am reasonably confident that these same professionals are also intelligent and regularly employ more than 2 neurons at once.  Thus, I am equally confident that mobile computing corporate leaders have been provided, by professionals like yourself, accurate assessments of what product configurations and what testing and quality controls would need to be put in place to provide acceptable levels of pre-launch quality assurances.

In my career, I have spent significant time on both sides of the desk: the lab bench and the manager’s chair.  So I know full well the tensions that can exist between the people that actually get the work done and those that are “leading” them.  Thus, I will hazard a guess that we are not discussing a technology/implementation/knowledge issue.  Rather, I see this as an economic, leadership and standard industry practices issue.

 

It has been my experience that when the scent of stinky doo-doo wafts out from under the corporate kimono, the first and largest hogs at the trough are usually generating the greatest quantities of pig sh*t.  I grew up in Iowa where, next to corn, hog farming is king.  Consequently, my nose is quite good at ferreting out the scent of pig poo.  If you have been unable to detect this scent hovering over the mobile computing industry and community, then you may take my word as gospel: it is there and it is getting more repulsive, not sweeter.

I have also seen plenty of firmware updates to other devices that have cause all kinds of problems, including games systems (PS3), media players, etc.

Again, not sure where you’re headed here, other than to refute or discount my statistically insignificant experience with N=2 game systems/services.  When I stated my experience I attempted to make it clear to the reader that I was stating one family’s experiences with a handful of systems and services spread over several years.  This approach respects the readers’ ability to draw appropriate conclusions from limited data by providing QUANTITATIVE, INTELLIGIBLE DATA.  If you wish to assert that the frequency of debilitating product crashes due to firmware updates in the gaming world is equal to or greater than that in the mobile computing world, I am all ears and ask that you pony up the valid stats to support that assertion.  If you have no such stats, then, do not distract us with your anecdotal “evidence” that carries less statistical weight than my N=2 sample.

As for cable providers, they have much more control over the devices they are updating, and don't have to worry about anybody loading other applications on them. This makes it much easier to test updates and eliminate most bugs ahead of time. But I have still seen problems with their updates too, just not as frequently.

Again, would you have the mobile computing community forego the benefits of adequate performance and quality control testing because it is hard or costly?  Please see the discussion above following your assertion that “No update can be tested against every possible phone configuration and combination of installed applications that people have.”  Please also see the discussion above regarding anecdotal “evidence” versus quantitative, intelligible data that informs the reader.

The medical, pharmaceutical, and food industries are regulated because people could be hurt or killed if they weren't. I have yet to see anybody die because their Swype keyboard didn't work right, or their favorites are no longer split into separate folders. This is a ridiculous comparison and is not relevant.

Interesting assertions, but your argument is inconsistent.  You correctly observed that med, pharma and food industries are regulated, in part, “because people could be hurt… if they weren’t.”  You then seem to assert that the mobile computing industry should be regulated ONLY if someone is KILLED as a consequence of industry malfeasance.  This applies a different standard to the mobile computing industry.  If, on the other hand, you were to apply the same standards to both industries, the following logic would apply:  If either industry has potential to cause EITHER significant INJURY OR death to its customers, then that/those industries should be regulated. 

It is a well-established principle of law in modern society that financial injury may constitute a legally significant injury.  Indeed, we have, since the great depression of the last century, created national and global financial regulatory agencies whose explicit mandate is to protect individuals, corporations and economies from financial injury by those who would engage in unscrupulous or illegal business and financial practices.  Should you continue to doubt the legal, ethical and moral significance of financial and economic injury, please reflect on the individual, corporate and national injuries that have been sustained as a result of 5+ years of global economic meltdown that has wiped out untold trillions of dollars of personal wealth and millions of jobs.  Your own retirement age has likely been increased as a direct consequence of financial injuries that you have sustained over the last 5 years.

If we can agree that the principle of financial injury is valid and that we, as a society, wish to regulate corporate and individual behavior to minimize financial injuries, then, in order to assess the appropriateness of regulating the mobile computing industry, we need only ask the following:  Has corporate behavior in the mobile computing industry ever caused, or does it have potential to cause, significant financial injury to significant numbers of consumers?  I assert that we can ignore ALL mobile computing corporate history predating Sprint’s ICS update release and still answer this question in the affirmative.  To support my assertion, I need only refer to the Sprint ICS update issue/bug reports littering the internet, many of which represent significant lost time and economic productivity to the users reporting the issues and, in many cases, to their employers.  Thus, the case can be made quite convincingly for more effective and ongoing regulation of this industry.

Finally, given the extent to which society has come to rely on mobile computing technology and the ubiquitous penetration of mobile devices and services into most facets of our lives, it is not out of the realm of the possible that mobile device dysfunction or malfunction may one day result in human deaths, if they have not already done so.

 

Thus, by the legal standards of injury potential and/or death potential, I assert that society and individuals have significant and compelling interest in regulating the behavior and practices of mobile computing corporations.  I further assert that whatever regulatory oversight is currently in place over this industry is woefully inadequate, given the plethora of significant economic injury reports from just a single firmware update.

Thank you, again, for adding your thoughts to the discussion.

Journeyman

Re: Failed and COSTLY Ice Cream Sandwich update and Swype fix (Epic 4G Touch Samsung Galaxy S2)

It obvious that those people that are complaining about this do not really understand that an update is never going to be perfect.  There are always going to be issues.  Some people will have more than others.  This is a  big jump in software for our phone, so there were bound to be issues.  As far as taking some time off to worry about a keyboard on your phone which you have myriads of other options for is just ridiculous.  Get a grip and stop complaining about some issues that AREN'T as big of a deal than you are making it seem.  There are a lot of other issues that are REALLY impactful in this update like battery life and signal issues.  Hopefully Sprint will address them or not, but in the end we all should have expected issues as we saw many of the other updates on the other carriers' GS2 devices had them as well.  I am having the battery and singal issue and I use my pnone for work as well.  Your loss of time is you posting these long winded notes on the forums.

Journeyman

Re: Failed and COSTLY Ice Cream Sandwich update and Swype fix (Epic 4G Touch Samsung Galaxy S2)

Putrwiz001 wrote:

Actually, GalSII, I work for a company where I am way too busy to spend the day fixing my pc or my phone.  However, I am smart enough to know that any major update (like changing to a new version of the android operating system) is going to have issues.  So I will check the internet (which took less than 5 minutes to do) to see what problems other people have first, and wait until the weekend to do the update, when I will have time to fix any problems that come up, without interfering with my job.

Nobody made any of you, that are complaining about sprint and samsung, do the update.  If your phone was working fine before, then there is no reason to update as soon as it appears on your phone.  I didn't see any features in this update that were so important that it had to be done immediately.  And clicking OK to do the update is not following Sprint's instructions.  Did they tell you that you had to update?  No.  A message came up on your phone telling you an update was available and asking if it was ok to install it.  If you clicked OK at that point, it is because you made the choice to update, not because you were instructed to.

In a perfect (ideal) world, the update would work perfectly, or there would be a rollback function.  Since this is not a perfect world, it is unreasonable to assume that a brand new update (which is done by Samsung, not Sprint) is going to be perfect.  I have never seen a major update to any phone that worked perfectly on every phone.  There are too many variations in hardware and software involved for them to be perfect.  That is why the SMART thing to do is check out what other people say about it first, and wait to do the update, until a time when you will not have to miss work and lose income if it doesn't all go perfectly.  But, if you are one of those people who have to have something right away, then you should be prepared for things like this to happen.  The bottom line is that you assumed there wouldn't be any problems with the update and then chose to install it right away.  You were wrong, and now you have to deal with it.

And sprint is not the only carrier that has these kinds of issues.  I have seen similar issues with other cell phone carriers, and other brands of phones.

Your comment and thoughts are seriously warped. I am a professional software architect for a living and have been for a long time. I can tell you that if my company were to push out software with this many issues we would loose our reputation and business! Our customers would quickly loose faith and my company would be out of business. This is extremely bad practice and really highlights the Software Developerment/QA/Release cyces that samsung + sprint failed to implement correctly when getting this release out the door. A cell phone is a MISSION CRITICAL device to thousands upon thousands of people. And to push out an update that can significantly alter the functionality of your device and reduce its performance / capabilities in any way shape or form is completely unacceptable. Sprint/Samung is not some ma an pa shop churning our software with the help of offhsoring in india. The are a fortune 500 company and a major competitor in this particular industry. They should be setting an example not producing **** like this!!!!!

Journeyman

Re: Failed and COSTLY Ice Cream Sandwich update and Swype fix (Epic 4G Touch Samsung Galaxy S2)

I agree with your points completely. I would also like to emphasize the downgrade feature they put on the browser auto wrap when you zoom on to a page. I have difficulty reading a page as it is. The autowrap feature was a great help. I can only imagine the inconvenience this creates for the more VISUALLY IMPAIRED or challenged user.

Prior to the latest Android ICS (Ice Cream Sandwich = v4.0.4) update that automatically appeared on my phone overnight as an OTA (Over The Air) update the web browser had a feature where if you pinch zoomed in on a page to make the text larger, the browser would automatically reformat the text to wrap within the page. This meant that the bigger text would flow to the next line within the frame/page.

However, after the ICS update, this auto format/reformat wrap feature no longer happened. Thus, when you zoomed into a page to increase the text size and make it more readable, the larger text would bleed off the page. In order to read the rest of the text you would have to annoyingly scroll left or right. You can imagine how inconvenient and tedious it now is to read a long text article such as news since you have to scroll right, then scroll down, then scroll left, then scroll right - you get the picture. Before all you needed was to scroll down.

Unfortunately, this downgrade feature which impairs the usability and efficiency of the browser  is now similar to what happens on the same Galaxy S2 for AT&T and the iPhones. (Just because your competitors have a suck*ss feature it doesn't mean you have to copy it). The auto format/reformat wrap on the browser was a very good usable feature that had a clear advantage over the other phones and carriers.

Q1: Is there a setting that will re-activate this auto format wrap feature?

Q2: Who is the idiot software engineer (from Google, Sprint or Samsung) that thought this downgrade was a great idea?

Q3: Who is the idiot project manager (from Google, Sprint or Samsung) that approved this great idea?

It seems like they were testing the browser on a larger screen and not on the actual smaller phone. If they tested it EXTENSIVELY on the actualy device they would have seen this glaring limitation!

Does anyone know of a setting or fix for this on the stock ICS browser?

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