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Character limits and texting

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Journeyman

Character limits and texting

PLEASE PLEASE fix this...Please Why isn't the Instinct able to either Automatically send text messages that exceed 160 characters as multiple messages?, OR AT LEAST allow user to save multiple drafts per recipient. On my A900, the 160 limit was hugely annoying, but at least I could break up what I was trying to send someone into multiple messages and save them as drafts, then send them one after the other in quick succession. Apparently, the Instinct only allows 1 draft per recipient ,and a recipient must be indicated prior to message composition. So, I have to start my message, send, continue composing, send, continue composing, send, etc etc until I get my message through. Not only is the lag time between messages, as I feverishly compose the next 160 character block of text, annoying to the recipient, it's disruptive to my train of thought. All in all, the Instinct's text capabilities, or lack thereof, seem designed specifically to make me look stupid and inarticulate

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Journeyman

Re: Character limits and texting

Well, there's a reason there is a character limit. Text messages are by design meant to be little short bits of text that you send back and forth. Just like Twitter for instance for a website comparison. You are trying to use them in a way that is not intended. If you need something longer, that's what email is for.

Journeyman

Perhaps that was the original intent when text messaging...

Perhaps that was the original intent when text messaging was created, and then mostly the purview of pre-teens. But these days text messaging is used widely by adults, and 160 characters isn't enough for an adult to convey much of anything. Especially an adult who would rather not drop all the vowels and use all the OMG abbreviations. I'm not suggesting that people use text messaging to write essays or holiday newsletters to each other. But these days there is much more information than can be conveyed in 160 characters. And text messages are much more convenient to use than email because it is quicker to compose, send, and read upon receipt , all WITHOUT having to deal with the internet connection. And consider this, a recipient may not have any of their email addresses set up for notification on their phone, but everyone's phone is set to immediately notify of incoming text message. But the most important reason why Sprint should either automatically break messages up, or allow the saving of multiple drafts, is because EVERYONE ELSE does. Like ATT and their LG Vu. Blackberry. Mogul. My old A900 flip phone. It's a design flaw, and I believe it could be fixed if the developers care enough to make the Instinct a good phone for texting....the second most popular use of cell phones besides making phone calls.

Journeyman

Re: Character limits and texting

I'm with Coaster on this... if you have such a long message and dislike the 160 character limit, then either email or call! It is a phone after all and if you have something long and important to tell someone, use it for it's primary purpose.

Patron

Re: Character limits and texting


@stephani9 wrote:
PLEASE PLEASE fix this...Please Why isn't the Instinct able to either Automatically send text messages that exceed 160 characters as multiple messages?, OR AT LEAST allow user to save multiple drafts per recipient. On my A900, the 160 limit was hugely annoying, but at least I could break up what I was trying to send someone into multiple messages and save them as drafts, then send them one after the other in quick succession. Apparently, the Instinct only allows 1 draft per recipient ,and a recipient must be indicated prior to message composition. So, I have to start my message, send, continue composing, send, continue composing, send, etc etc until I get my message through. Not only is the lag time between messages, as I feverishly compose the next 160 character block of text, annoying to the recipient, it's disruptive to my train of thought. All in all, the Instinct's text capabilities, or lack thereof, seem designed specifically to make me look stupid and inarticulate

There is a way to get 1000 characters.

1. If you choose to send a picture text first (it's the lower right icon after you select the messaging app).

2. Select the pencil and paper icon in the upper left corner.

3. Choose your contact.

4. Select text only, you will get a character limit of 1000.

I hope this helps you with your issue.

This 1000 character limit may be changed someday by Sprint but it works for now.

Patron

Re: Character limits and texting

The limit comes, because some handsets does not support many letters on a text message. My dad has a mogul, and aperently he has no set limits, and I used to get like 3 text messages in the end, when he only sent one.

Master

Re: Character limits and texting


@Coasterbuf wrote:
Well, there's a reason there is a character limit. Text messages are by design meant to be little short bits of text that you send back and forth. Just like Twitter for instance for a website comparison. You are trying to use them in a way that is not intended. If you need something longer, that's what email is for.

Coaster, I know where your coming from and I agree, that's a good purpose for email. But the problem is, over half my friends, family and coworkers don't have email capability on their phones and probably aren't near a computer to retrieve the email.

I too liked the idea of being able to create multiple drafts and then send them in quick recession, I miss the feature. I've trained my friends, if they see a 'p1' at the end of my msg, to expect additional msg's because I ran out of room. Then I finish up with 'end' on my last msg.I just have to make sure I leave enough room for the p1, p2, etc.. on the previous msg's. 😕


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If my post or someone else's answered your question please mark it an Accepted Solution.

Keep in mind, like you, I am a Sprint subscriber. I am in no way employed by Sprint in any sense. I just know stuff.
Journeyman

Re: Character limits and texting

I totally agree that they should at least extend the limit. 200 would be just fine. I sometimes have to send two text to the same person because there is not enough space! I am a text head, on a 450 everything plan bc i don't use the talk time at all texting is so much easier but sometimes I have a lot to say...

Master

Re: Character limits and texting


@d4punkrock wrote:
I totally agree that they should at least extend the limit. 200 would be just fine. I sometimes have to send two text to the same person because there is not enough space! I am a text head, on a 450 everything plan bc i don't use the talk time at all texting is so much easier but sometimes I have a lot to say...

Unfortunately, as NSpeed pointed out, not all phones and carriers support the same text limits, extending it would possibly lead to a bigger headache then adding the ability to create multiple drafts.


--
If my post or someone else's answered your question please mark it an Accepted Solution.

Keep in mind, like you, I am a Sprint subscriber. I am in no way employed by Sprint in any sense. I just know stuff.
Journeyman

Re: Character limits and texting

I would take the multiple drafts then no problem

Journeyman

Re: Character limits and texting

It's all a big conspiracy by the Big 4 to make their agreed upon 20 cents per txt... that's why they're investigating the price hikes in the past few years. If you had a larger limit, they wouldn't make as much money. SRSLY

Journeyman

Re: Character limits and texting

Texting (actually SMS or Short Message Service) was originally developed when cell phones moved from analog to digital. The 160 character limit was derived during this time and is based on the issue of payload length. The max that can be sent is based on using the protocol of an 8 bit alphabet. If you use a 7 bit alphabet, you get 160 characters. If you use an 8 bit alphabet you get a limit of 140 characters. The original intent (from what I understand) was to let a mobile user know they had a voicemail

But if you are writing more than 160 characters, an email may be more appropriate.

I do not think the pioneers of this technology ever dreamed it would become as popular as it is. Looking at what it has evolved into, picture mail, voice sms and an everyday communications feature for millions, the brevity of sms is a huge plus, I think.

That beins said, considering that the protocol was based on late 1980's technology, perhaps it is time for an update.

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