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How do YOU use PTT every day?

Journeyman

How do YOU use PTT every day?

This is a call for all Sprint-Nextel PTT users (iDEN and Qchat) to post any and all ways illustrating how they use PTT every day to make life easier or more efficient for themselves, their families, or their businesses.

This is an open forum to collect ALL of the ways that PTT is used, so that existing and futurePTT users might learn some valuable tips. The goal is to collect all of the ways that Sprint-Nextel PTT users out therein the real world actually use their PTT capabilities, and put the resultinglist in one place so everyone benefits from the experiences of all.

Doesn't matter if you think it's obvious or not, or if you think it might be trivial or silly. Like all good "brainstorming" sessions, all suggestions are considered, and no one criticizes anyone else's ideas. It's supposed to be a positive environment for the free flow of ideas and different ways to use PTT to the max.

Definitions: For the purposes of this thread, the acronyms "PTT" (push-to-talk), "DC" (Direct Connect) and "NDC" (Nextel Direct Connect) all refer to Sprint-Nextel push-to-talk,whether Nextel iDEN or CDMA Qchat. If for any reason you need to refer to one or the other specifically (e.g. if one has a specific feature you are illustratingwhile the other doesn't), please use the terms "iDEN DC" and "Qchat" to differentiate between the two.

Strictly to get the ball rolling, I'll start with a few ways I am aware of to use PTT to enhance efficiency or save time in every day living. Please all of you add your own ways to this starter list:

1) "DEW" (distant early warning) system: Coming home from the grocery store, chirp the household when you're a block away, so that the kids or spouse or whoever comes down to the meet the car and help carry in the groceries.

2) Same as above, but when bringing home take-out food, chirp the household when you're a block away so that everyone stops their current activities and gathers at the table so that they all get served while the food is still warm.

3) Someone in the household is sick and needs occasional assistance. You pre-arrange it so that the well person elsewhere in the house knows that a single chirp from the sick person means "please come help me when you have a moment", and two chirps in a row from the sick person means "please come here right away". Because sometimes the sick person really doesn't feel like talking (or can't talk), the pre-arranged "chirp code" makes it easier on them.

4) My elderly father (93) is hard of hearing and has arthritic hands. Often when I call him on his Nextel phone by the time he realizes it is ringing and fumbles to get the phone out of its clip, it has gone to voicemail (even with the extended ring time option enabled). I chirp him twice in a row, then place a regular cellular call, and with those two warning chirps before the call he is able to answer the phone about 90% of the time. Another advantage of this "prep for incoming call" signal is that he knows for certain it is me calling, without ever having to look at the phone display to see if he wants to take the call.

5) In the same vein, because my Pop has a difficult time placing an outgoing call from his Nextel phone (remember, he's 93, his eyesight is poor, and the arthritis in his hands makes it difficult to always press the right buttons), when he wants to talk to me he just chirps me once. I see that it is Pop trying to reach me, and that is my cue to call him. Once I'm ringing his phone, one push of his external speaker button and he and I are connected and he can hear me loud and clear. (I know to younger people this sounds ridiculous, but believe me, for a 93 year old person, it is the only way we can communicate with him via telephone, and it's the only method that has worked for his particular situation. He had a Verizon Nokia bar phone he just couldn't use at all with the small buttons and small display screen, then we tried the Jitterbug "old folks phone" but that didn't work either [unreliable due to being an MVNO on Verizon's network, and about half of the incoming calls went to voicemail even when Pop's Jitterbug phone had full signal]. This method of using NDC is the only thing that works for him, and it works well.)

6) With two or more vehicles traveling in a caravan and if using regular cellular phone service, if one vehicle is about to make a wrong turn, or if there has to be a quick change in directions, by the time regular cell-phones can connect and be answered the lead vehicle would be a couple of hundred feet past the turn. The speed of NDC and the ability to Group Call is perfect for getting the info quickly to the others in the caravan. Also, if everyone in the caravan has their phones in the default "PTT speaker ON" mode, the other drivers don't need to pick up their phones to answer, they just hear the lead person on the PTT speaker and immediately change direction according to those instructions.

7) Meeting up with someone in a crowded area, one party sees the other and can use NDC to efficiently guide them over to where they are. Or if neither one can see the other yet, one party looks around and calls out an easily-spotted landmark, describes it to the other party, and they both work their way to that meeting point.

Those are a few ways our family uses NDC. Please all of you Sprint-Nextel PTT users on BAW chime in to contribute your own ways and ideas, no matter if you think your ways of using PTT are cool ideas or not. Remember, all tips/suggestions/PTT methods are welcome, for the benefit of us all.

Nxtl4me

(Will England, can you or someone else at BAWtake charge of collecting all of the contributions and creating a clean, formatted,orderedlist somewhere that all of us can access easily?)

10 REPLIES 10
Journeyman

Re: How do YOU use PTT every day?

I don't use mine everyday but when I do it's for a guick call or to see if somebody is where they told me

Journeyman

Re: How do YOU use PTT every day?

I used to use it daily, it gives you a quick no-nonsense conversation. Super useful and I miss it desperately. If sprint would include it in the new rate plans or for 5.00 a month I would buy a V950 on ebay and do ESN swaps between it and the instinct whenever I need to. I really would like plan revisions.

Wizard

Re: How do YOU use PTT every day?

Hey there. I do use my PTT every day to keep up with a fellow Ham radio op and highschool alum while we discuss a project we wanna do for the upcomming all-school reunion this June. With NDC i get, as someone else so well put it, a no-nonsense way to chat up this thing, and we don`t need to tie up the regular repeaters (on the Amateur Radio channels) so others may use them instead, it also is good as the site that i`d use to reach him (he`s in Janesville, WI) i can`t reliablely reach from here, and the site he`d use is the same for him, so, PTT to the rescue (it`s also nice to be able to have a chat without someone comming on and telling us to, sometimes rather colorfully, change channels ). N9NRA

Sprint Product Ambassador

Re: How do YOU use PTT every day?

Got it subscribed to - I'll collect these responses and see how we can use them!

Product Ambassador, long time Sprint employee
Journeyman

Re: How do YOU use PTT every day?

Thank you Will.

See new reply below withsuggestions from a PM fromjrfdsf.

-Nxtl4me

Message Edited by Nxtl4me on 04-29-2009 11:40 PM

Journeyman

Re: How do YOU use PTT every day?


jrfdsf contributed these thoughts in a recentPM:

I think inventing new uses for PTT is a great idea. If folks could see justhow valuable it is to be able to instantly talk to someone without dialing and waiting, sales would go through the roof. People these days are more interested in texting it seems. While texting, email, and traditional phone calls all work, PTT addresses the need for instant AND fast communication. Much easier to use while driving- I might add.

I've always thought that PTT was one of the best kept secrets in the cellular industry. When it's instant like Nextel, it's great!

If you do start a thread, I'll be happy to add to it. Talking while driving is definitely better using Nextel than a bluetooth or speakerphone with a regular call. Speakerphones cut out and bluetooth requires sticking something in your ear.

Here are some other uses:

House intercom. Beep, beep; "honey, where are my keys?" "In the living room where you left them." Thanks!" End of conversation.

At The Mall. Beep, beep; "Where is everyone?" "I'm at the food court." "I'm in JCPenny." "I'm in Radio Shack." "OK, let's meet up at the fountain in about 10!" End of conversation. No need for separate walkies to carry around. One device for each person. Even if the mall has ZERO cellular coverage! [i.e. using Direct Talk] Re-apply for hiking, cycling, skiing,or other similar activities.

Emergency Phone Calls. No other communication system over cellular allows you to assign immediate importance to calls. By designating call alerts as important or emergency calls, users can identify what calls need to be answered ASAP vs. those that are lesscritical. Even texting requires you to pick up the phone and look at it first.

Feel free to use any or all of these in your thread.

-jrfdsf


Journeyman

Re: How do YOU use PTT every day?

I would love to use it more, but no one I communicate with has Nextel/Boost. Well, almost no one anyway. At work I use it with a co-worker so we can talk when one of us is in the lab, because our lab has no phone.

Journeyman

Re: How do YOU use PTT every day?

To keep in touch myFriends in Latin America (Brazil, Peru, Argentina, Chile and Mexico). From previous experiences the PTSN system in Brazil can be atrocious in maintaining callsconnected. IDC solved that problem. Also when traveling to IDC countries being able to stay in contact with home for little to next to nothing in cost while roaming.

I just wish they could expand IDC to other iden networks around the world. BEEP BEEP Korea can you hear me..

Doing IDCto other iden/harmony networks isn't that expensive since only MOTO makes thebackend equipment.

I feel naked when I can't use my radio...

Re: How do YOU use PTT every day?


@Mackdad wrote:

To keep in touch myFriends in Latin America (Brazil, Peru, Argentina, Chile and Mexico). From previous experiences the PTSN system in Brazil can be atrocious in maintaining callsconnected. IDC solved that problem. Also when traveling to IDC countries being able to stay in contact with home for little to next to nothing in cost while roaming.

I just wish they could expand IDC to other iden networks around the world. BEEP BEEP Korea can you hear me..

Doing IDCto other iden/harmony networks isn't that expensive since only MOTO makes thebackend equipment.

I feel naked when I can't use my radio...


Believe it or not, that was actually the next step for Nextel if they did not merge with Sprint. They were actually in the process of striking a deal with Telefonica's O2 in the UK. The idea was O2 could adopt some of the PTT iDEN technology that Nextel used (since it used different frequencies than O2 was already utilizing), in exchange for Nextel having a presense in Europe (even it was in name only). Ah well...that idea went up in smoke. Same holds true for other actual full iDEN networks.

Journeyman

Re: How do YOU use PTT every day?

Hmm I heard another story. They were working with Mirs in Israel and Xpress in Jordan to get IDC working to and from the US. At one point Xpress and Mirs were advertising it back in early 2006 on there websites. Since Sprint bought Nextel those planes were shelved.

I was in Israel in 2006 thinking that they were in test mode and got the fat restricted service. I felt naked when I was there.

Since Xpress and Mirs had the infrasturcture set up they are able to IDC between their two networks.

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